Author Archives: Phil Ford

About Phil Ford

Chairman of the Committee for the Memorial to the Victims of Modernism

This will be our reply to violence: to make music more intensely, more beautifully, more devotedly than ever before

Update: Right after I posted this it occurred to me that I had posted video of fascists marching (from 2015, btw) and missed my chance to insert the perfect reaction gif:  

Posted in Image post, Politics

Good prose is written by people who are not frightened

This summer has been, for me, the summer of Twin Peaks. I am a huge David Lynch fan from way back. Twin Peaks gives me all kinds of things I can write about, not least of which is my theory … Continue reading

Posted in Academia, Podcasts, Politics, Weird Studies | 6 Comments

Trump vs. Trudeau: An Analysis

I suppose it’s a sign of what things have come to when we celebrate a successfully defended handshake as a famous victory. But I’ll take it. I have never been prouder, as a Canadian, than when Justin Trudeau shrewdly countered Donald … Continue reading

Posted in Athletics, Gestural analysis, Politics | 1 Comment

#nobannowall

Me at the Bloomington “No Ban No Wall” protest today. So much for my short-lived “I’m not talking about American politics” thing. Trump affects the lives of people around the world, including Canadians. Viva la résistance, wherever you are.

Posted in Come at me bro

#triggered

Image | Posted on | 1 Comment

SHTF

It’s been a while since Jonathan and I got into a scrap on Dial M. I kind of missed it. Whatever else may be said about Jonathan, he’s a fighter, and I like that about him. A couple of people … Continue reading

Posted in Blogging, Current Affairs, Ethics, Politics | 1 Comment

Prometheus

I have been puzzling about how to react to Jonathan’s recent squall of fury. Long story short: I didn’t like it. I’m not going to get into the politics of the 2016 election, because as I’ve written elsewhere, I think … Continue reading

Posted in Cognitive liberty, Current Affairs, Education, Sticking Up For The Humanities!, Teaching | 1 Comment